Is Microsoft intruding on Windows 10 users?

Is Microsoft intruding on Windows 10 users?

We’ve covered almost every nook and cranny related to the topic of pop-ups. The intrusive user experience has to go, plain and simple. 

Google doesn’t like popups, customers don’t like them, and most European businesses are horrified about the idea that pop-ups because they find them rude and annoying. In general, the internet has been pushing toward providing a better UX for a while, but now a big industry player is not only leaving their notifications and ads but adding more.

Image courtesy of Windows 10 reddit thread.

Image courtesy of Windows 10 reddit thread.

The tech giant under attack is Microsoft. The Guardian reported today that Microsoft’s Windows 10 users are “complaining about Microsoft inserting adverts for its OneDrive cloud service directly into Windows 10’s File Explorer.”

To the point: Microsoft is using its Windows operating system to push ads and notifications for their products. 

Microsoft has used this nagging marketing tactic before within Windows 7 and 8. The current annoyance in Windows 10 that has users riled up are what Microsoft calls “sync provider notifications.”

The Verge quoted a Microsoft spokesperson trying to make a point that the OneDrive pop-up is a “tip” and that users could opt out of the provider notifications. Their justification for the pop-up was this: “The new tips notifications within the File Explorer in Windows 10 were designed to help Windows 10 customers by providing quick, easy information to enhance the experience relative to storage and cloud file management.”

In a discussion thread about Windows 10, the feedback is mixed. Some users say they’ve never seen a pop-up. The other half of the commenters are irritated beyond belief. 

Source: Windows 10 reddit thread. Modified for our audience. 

Source: Windows 10 reddit thread. Modified for our audience. 

Pop-ups on web pages are considered bad practice and poor UX, making the thought of pop-ups in paid systems just disrespectful.

Or is it? Quite a few Microsoft customers in the discussion thread hopped in to defend their service provider. Collectively, the defending side's statements and questions all reflect the same stance,

"Shouldn't companies be allowed to innovate and monetize their own product?"

Dare we say it, that is a valid question. The question to follow would be, "At what cost?"

If the ads were present before purchasing the software, would it not make sense to not have to experience the ads after purchase? Customers that are paying a premium make the point that if they're paying a premium, they do not want to be bothered by the ads and tips.

Some customers are unbothered. They know there's the option to turn off the notifiers and acknowledge the reality that they're bound to experience ads elsewhere anyway.

Point proven:    

Image courtesy of Windows 10 reddit thread.

Image courtesy of Windows 10 reddit thread.

Ah, the Internet. What a wonderful place. 

What do you think is the best move for Microsoft?  

We believe in engaging your customers without annoying them. Talk with us.